07
Mar

USAR SEARCH DOGSUrban Search and Rescue (USAR) Search Dogs are unique and incredibly valuable as a resource in the location of people trapped following the collapse of structures.

The fast and effective location of trapped victims increases their chances of rescue and recovery. Humans shed up to 40,000 skin cells every minute and it is these tiny particles floating in the air that USAR dogs are trained to locate.

These amazing animals must be healthy, energetic, high drive dogs who can cope with the stress of being around many other dogs, handlers, rescue workers and the noise, confusion and stress of a rescue site.

The dogs are only one part of the team. USAR dog handlers are all volunteers based throughout New Zealand.

They must undertake basic rescue training to work safely in the rescue environment and fit this around many hours training with their canine partners.

While hard work, training a USAR dog is very rewarding. It offers a great opportunity to help the community in a time of need.

USAR Search Dogs took part in the search and rescue operation in the Christ Church earthquake 5 years ago.

This was the start of what was to be the largest deployment of USAR and USAR dogs in NZ history, and for these handlers the beginning of a very long 30+ hours searching for survivors.

The NZ USAR Search Dog Association is committed to the development of a USAR search dog capability for New Zealand.

USAR search dogs are a unique and incredibly valuable resource in the location of people trapped following the collapse of structures eg following earthquakes, tornados, landslides and other natural and man-made disasters. The fast and effective location of trapped victims has a major effect on their chances of rescue and recovery.

To read more about USAR Search Dogs CLICK HERE.

The 2016 Australian and New Zealand Search and Rescue Conference (ANZSAR); Land, Sea & Air will be held at the Jupiters Hotel, Gold Coast on the 1 June 2016. To register for the conference CLICK HERE.



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